Performance Details

Department of Fish and Game - Wildlife Conservation

Mission

To conserve and enhance Alaska's wildlife and habitats and provide for a wide range of public uses and benefits.

Core Services

  • Maintain and enhance opportunities to hunt, trap, and view wildlife.
  • Provide opportunities for Alaskans to gain knowledge of and appreciation for Alaska's wildlife, its management, and ways to safely and ethically interact with wildlife.

Arrow GraphicMission Results

Core Services
A: Healthy and sustainable wildlife populations in Alaska that provide a diversity of opportunities for public use and enjoyment.  Details >
A1: Maintain and enhance opportunities to hunt, trap, and view wildlife.  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Increase sales of hunting and trapping licenses to the three-year average.
A2: Provide opportunities for Alaskans to gain knowledge of and appreciation for Alaska's wildlife, its management, and ways to safely and ethically interact with wildlife.  Details >

Performance Detail


A: Result - Healthy and sustainable wildlife populations in Alaska that provide a diversity of opportunities for public use and enjoyment.

A1: Core Service - Maintain and enhance opportunities to hunt, trap, and view wildlife.
    
Target #1: Increase sales of hunting and trapping licenses to the three-year average.

Methodology: License Statistics by Calendar year. Includes combination licenses. Excludes Big game tags.

Sales of Hunting and Trapping Licenses
Year Resident Non Resident 3 yr Target
2017
121724
-22.12%
12573
-37.94%
155423
-4.31%
2016
156300
+12.75%
20261
+20.71%
162427
+5.08%
2015
138625
-0.48%
16785
+4.85%
154577
+0.48%
2014
139300
+1.48%
16009
+1.65%
153837
+0.02%
2013
137264
+0.09%
15749
-1.87%
153808
+0.95%
2012
137140
-1.94%
16049
+4.42%
152360
-0.05%
2011
139851
+4.29%
15370
+5.45%
152440
+2.78%
2010
134094
-3.82%
14576
+4.05%
148313
+0.12%
2009
139420
14008
148135

Analysis of results and challenges: These totals are calendar year and include resident, nonresident and military hunting and trapping licenses. It also includes combination licenses such as Hunting/Fishing. Tag fees paid primarily by nonresidents are not included.

The most common resident license is the Hunt/Sport Fish license.

One incentive for hunters and trappers to buy licenses is confidence that game populations are abundant and that there are good opportunities to hunt and harvest game. The increased number of resident hunters may be a direct result of our Hunter Education program activities. Non-resident numbers likely reflect the state of the economy, as well as increased energy and airfare costs.

In the 2016 legislative session HB137 was passed to increase license fees for both resident and non-resident hunters and fishermen. The increase became effective on 1/1/17, however 2017 licenses were available for purchase well before that date. As a result hunters were able to purchase their 2017 licenses at the reduced 2016 rate. This resulted in a spike of license purchases in 2016.

Related links:
   • ADF&G License page



A2: Core Service - Provide opportunities for Alaskans to gain knowledge of and appreciation for Alaska's wildlife, its management, and ways to safely and ethically interact with wildlife.
    
Target #1: Satisfaction of wildlife experience.


Satisfaction by experience
Year Resident Hunt Exp NonResident Hunt Exp Resident Wildlf View NonResident Wildlif View YTD Total Quarter 6 Quarter 7
2011
82%
88%
91%
94%
0
0
0

Analysis of results and challenges: These results are from a survey conducted in 2011.
    
Target #2: Economic value of wildlife.

Methodology: Hunting and viewing supported 27,000 jobs and represented $1.3 billion in labor income.

$3.0 billion total net benefit in 2011
Year NetBenefit View Wildlife NetBenefit Hunting
2011
$2.5
$0.5

Analysis of results and challenges: These results are from a survey conducted in 2011.

 

Current as of October 16, 2018