Performance Details

Department of Fish and Game

Mission

To protect, maintain, and improve the fish, game, and aquatic plant resources of the state, and manage their use and development in the best interest of the economy and the well-being of the people of the state, consistent with the sustained yield principle. Alaska Constitution Article 8, Sec. 4; AS 16.05.020(2)

Core Services

  • Management
  • Stock Assessment and Research
  • Customer Service and Public Involvement

Arrow GraphicResults

Core Services
A: Department Result  Details >
A1: Management  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Review all Fish Habitat and Special Area permits to ensure agency requirements for protection of fish, wildlife, and their habitats are met.
  • TARGET #2: Enhance angler opportunity by meeting annual projections for number of fish and number of locations stocked as indicated in the Division's updates to the Statewide Stocking Plan.
  • TARGET #3: Maintain total annual value of commercial harvests at over $1 billion annually.
A2: Stock Assessment and Research  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Update and maintain the Community Subsistence Information System (CSIS), an online public information resource, by including all studies completed during the fiscal year.
  • TARGET #2: Achieve salmon escapement goals in 80% of monitored systems.
A3: Customer Service and Public Involvement  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Increase sales of hunting and trapping licenses to the three-year average.
  • TARGET #2: Return sport fishing license sales and revenue collection to 2008 levels to ensure excellence in fisheries management and research for the benefit of sport anglers, the state's economy, and future generations of Alaskans.

Performance Detail


A: Result - Department Result

A1: Core Service - Management
    
Target #1: Review all Fish Habitat and Special Area permits to ensure agency requirements for protection of fish, wildlife, and their habitats are met.


Number of Permits Issued
Fiscal Year Permits Issued
FY 2017
1539
FY 2016
1716
FY 2015
3309
FY 2014
4236
FY 2013
4111

Analysis of results and challenges: FY2015 includes 672 stream crossings which were multiple locations on several permits.
Major reasons for permit decreases:
1) Substantial decrease in over the counter mining permits as a result of using general permits;
2) Placer permits, many are being issued for five years rather than one, over time this starts a fairly substantial decline;
3) The economic decline in the state has slowed development projects.
    
Target #2: Enhance angler opportunity by meeting annual projections for number of fish and number of locations stocked as indicated in the Division's updates to the Statewide Stocking Plan.


Comparison of Planned v Actual for Number of Release Sites and Numbers Released
Year Planned Sites Actual Sites Planned Release (x100K) Actual Release (x100K)
2017
272
-0.37%
266
-1.85%
69.38
+6.22%
69.83
+4.47%
2016
273
+1.11%
271
+2.26%
65.32
-4.19%
66.84
-5.1%
2015
270
-3.57%
265
-2.93%
68.18
+2.17%
70.43
+7.22%
2014
280
-0.71%
273
-0.36%
66.73
-5.02%
65.69
-9.88%
2013
282
-3.75%
274
-3.18%
70.26
-7.42%
72.89
-4.02%
2012
293
+41.55%
283
+47.4%
75.89
+0.46%
75.94
+6.97%
2011
207
-21.59%
192
-24.71%
75.54
-10.52%
70.99
-18.21%
2010
264
+13.3%
255
+4.94%
84.42
+11.93%
86.80
+12.1%
2009
233
-11.07%
243
-6.9%
75.42
-1.04%
77.43
+7.26%
2008
262
261
76.21
72.19

Analysis of results and challenges: Completion of the Ruth Burnett Sport Fish Hatchery in Fairbanks and the William Jack Hernandez Hatchery in Anchorage has allowed the division to stabilize fish production while improving the quality of fish released for anglers. During this time some stocking locations have been eliminated due to lack of effort and/or poor survivals. Despite these targeted reductions we anticipate angler demand and participation in stocked fisheries to increase in ensuing years. Please consult the Division of Sport Fish Statewide Stocking Plan for details (link provided below).

Related links:
   • Division of Sport Fish Stocking Plan


    
Target #3: Maintain total annual value of commercial harvests at over $1 billion annually.

Methodology: Exvessel values are calculated using a combination of aggregated price point per species derived from the Commercial Operators Annual Report, fish ticket databases and annual fishery harvest summary reports. Beginning in 2016 Alaska mariculture value is no longer collected or included in the 2016 value total.

Exvessel Value of Commercial Harvests in Alaska
Year Total Value
2017
$2,057
2016
$1,819
2015
$1,932
2014
$1,984
2013
$2,094
2012
$2,172
2011
$2,228
2010
$1,764
2009
$1,501
2008
$1,967
2007
$1,789
2006
$1,426
2005
$1,353
2004
$1,233
2003
$1,100
2002
$1,074
2001
$1,040

Analysis of results and challenges: The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) contributes to the success of the seafood industry through its scientific management of the various fisheries resources. Scientific management practices allow for the largest harvests that can be biologically sustained over time. ADF&G also plays a vital role by the adoption of regulations and fisheries management plans, in conjunction with the Alaska Board of Fisheries, fishermen, and processors, that provide orderly fisheries producing high quality products in a cost effective manner for utilization by the seafood industry.



A2: Core Service - Stock Assessment and Research
    
Target #1: Update and maintain the Community Subsistence Information System (CSIS), an online public information resource, by including all studies completed during the fiscal year.

Methodology: Tally number of communities with quantitative survey data added to the Community Subsistence Information System.

Number of Community Studies Formatted for Community Database
Fiscal Year Southeast Southcentral & SW Interior, West, Arctic Total
FY 2017
2
-50%
24
+9.09%
31
+55%
57
+23.91%
FY 2016
4
+300%
22
+120%
20
+66.67%
46
+100%
FY 2015
1
-80%
10
-37.5%
12
-29.41%
23
-39.47%
FY 2014
5
+66.67%
16
+6.67%
17
-22.73%
38
-5%
FY 2013
3
15
22
40

Analysis of results and challenges: The CSIS is the State of Alaska's single source of community-level subsistence harvest information. Stand-alone datasets from annual salmon and halibut harvest surveys are planned for merging into the CSIS, so all harvest information can be available through a single portal. As funding levels decline, capacity to add data to the CSIS is affected. Division capacity to add data to the CSIS has increased as processes have become more streamlined over FY2017. FY2017 includes several historical community datasets.

Related links:
   • See Division of Subsistence CSIS


    
Target #2: Achieve salmon escapement goals in 80% of monitored systems.

Methodology: Regional tabulation of the monitored systems that are within or above the goal range.

Escapement Goals Achieved
Year Goals Achieved Target
2016
72%
80%
2015
88%
80%
2014
77%
80%
2013
76%
80%
2012
69%
80%
2011
77%
80%
2010
76%
80%
2009
71%
80%
2008
74%
80%
2007
90%
80%
2006
90%
80%
2005
87%
80%
2004
85%
80%
2003
86%
80%
2002
86%
80%
2001
85%
80%

Analysis of results and challenges: Managing commercial, subsistence, and personal use harvests in ways that protect the reproductive potential of fish stocks is the most basic responsibility of the Division of Commercial Fisheries (Division). The Division's success in performing this function is the most direct indicator of program success, as well as the best indicator of continued healthy fish stocks. Success in achieving salmon escapement goals is probably the most common measure of success that salmon managers and research staff apply to their own performance.

The division annually deploys and operates numerous weirs, counting towers, and sonar sites to conduct escapement counts. Aerial and foot surveys are also used extensively in the absence of other means of counting escapement.


In 2016, there were 287 salmon escapement goals in Alaska. Of the stocks with goals, 242 were adequately assessed in 2016 and of those, 72% met or exceeded their escapement goal. For Chinook salmon, there are currently 66 stock specific goals. Despite improvements in meeting Chinook salmon escapement goals statewide since 2012, 2016 saw a decrease to 54%. For pink salmon, there are currently 38 escapement goals in even years. In 2016, only 47% of the pink salmon goals were met or exceeded. There was a decrease in percentage of meeting escapement goals for sockeye, chum and coho salmon as well, but not to the extent of Chinook or pink salmon. For sockeye salmon, 86% of the goals were met –down 1% from 2015. For chum salmon, 77% of the goals were met.


A3: Core Service - Customer Service and Public Involvement
    
Target #1: Increase sales of hunting and trapping licenses to the three-year average.

Methodology: License Statistics by Calendar year. Includes combination licenses.

Sales of Hunting and Trapping Licenses
Year Resident Non Resident Target
2017
121724
-22.12%
12573
-37.94%
162427
+5.08%
2016
156300
+12.75%
20261
+20.71%
154577
+0.48%
2015
138625
-0.48%
16785
+4.85%
153837
+0.02%
2014
139300
+1.48%
16009
+1.65%
153808
+0.95%
2013
137264
+0.09%
15749
-1.87%
152360
-0.05%
2012
137140
-1.94%
16049
+4.42%
152440
+2.78%
2011
139851
+4.29%
15370
+5.45%
148313
0%
2010
134094
-3.82%
14576
+4.05%
148313
0%
2009
139420
14008
148313

Analysis of results and challenges: These totals are calendar year and include resident, nonresident and military hunting and trapping licenses. It also includes combination licenses such as Hunting/Fishing. Tag fees paid primarily by nonresidents are not included.

The most common resident license is the Hunt/Sport Fish license.

One incentive for hunters and trappers to buy licenses is confidence that game populations are abundant and that there are good opportunities to hunt and harvest game. The increased number of resident hunters may be a direct result of our Hunter Education program activities. Non-resident numbers likely reflect the state of the economy, as well as increased energy and airfare costs.

In the 2016 legislative session HB137 was passed to increase license fees for both resident and non-resident hunters and fishermen. The increase became effective on 1/1/17, however 2017 licenses were available for purchase well before that date. As a result hunters were able to purchase their 2017 licenses at the reduced 2016 rate. This resulted in a spike of license purchases in 2016.

Related links:
   • http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=license.statistics


    
Target #2: Return sport fishing license sales and revenue collection to 2008 levels to ensure excellence in fisheries management and research for the benefit of sport anglers, the state's economy, and future generations of Alaskans.

Methodology: Number of licenses issued and net revenue is shown by calendar year and was obtained from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G), Division of Administrative Services (DAS), Licensing Section. Net revenue amount includes the surcharge collected on individual licenses for hatchery bond repayment but does not include king salmon stamp sales.

Fishing Licenses Issued by Calendar Year
Year Resident Nonresident Total License Issued Target Net Revenue Collected Net Revenue Target
2016
203,413
+6.85%
300,862
+4.14%
504,275
+5.21%
486,405
0%
$16,893.4 M
$16,480.1 M
2015
190,366
+0.44%
288,915
+5.62%
479,281
+3.5%
486,405
0%
$16,104.0 M
$16,480.1 M
2014
189,540
+1.08%
273,535
+2.73%
463,075
+2.05%
486,405
0%
$15,329.4 M
$16,480.1 M
2013
187,507
+2.06%
266,271
+4.96%
453,778
+3.74%
486,405
0%
$14,936.7 M
$16,480.1 M
2012
183,725
-3.38%
253,694
-1.99%
437,419
-2.58%
486,405
0%
$14,447.7 M
$16,480.1 M
2011
190,148
+1.8%
258,840
+1.33%
448,988
+1.53%
486,405
0%
$14,733.4 M
$16,480.1 M
2010
186,777
-4.05%
255,432
+1.19%
442,209
-1.09%
486,405
0%
$14,641.3 M
$16,480.1 M
2009
194,658
+4.48%
252,427
-15.88%
447,085
-8.08%
486,405
0%
$14,624.5 M
$16,480.1 M
2008
186,311
300,094
486,405
486,405
$16,480.1 M
$16,480.1 M

Analysis of results and challenges: Both sport fishing license sales and participation have fluctuated since 2008. Resident license sales remain stable during this period whereas 2016 non-resident license sales exceeded the last high year of 2008. The contemporary challenge for the division is to return non-resident participation in sport fisheries to the 2008 participation threshold, and 2016 exceeded that target.

Related links:
   • ADF&G License Statistics


 

Current as of January 30, 2018