Performance Details

Department of Public Safety

Mission

The mission of the Department of Public Safety is to ensure public safety and enforce fish and wildlife laws. AS 44.41.020

Core Services

  • Law Enforcement Patrol & Investigations
  • Rural Law Enforcement
  • Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Programs
  • Statewide Public Safety Programs
  • Resource Protection
  • Highway Safety

Arrow GraphicResults

Core Services
A: Department Result  Details >
A1: Law Enforcement Patrol & Investigations  Details >
  • TARGET #1: 35% of property crimes reported result in the identification of a suspect or offender
A2: Rural Law Enforcement  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Increase by 5% over the previous year the number of training hours provided to Village Public Safety Officers and other rural law enforcement personnel
A3: Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Programs  Details >
  • TARGET #1: As a result of contact with a victim service program, 80% of participants know more ways to plan for their safety
  • TARGET #2: 100% of sex offender registrations are available online
A4: Statewide Public Safety Programs  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Reduce unintentional fire fatalities (non-homicide) to less than 13 annual fatalities
  • TARGET #2: State and national criminal justice information is released to authorized entities within 10 working days of receipt of the request
  • TARGET #3: 30% of all buildings scheduled for priority fire and life safety building inspections to be found in compliance at time of inspection
  • TARGET #4: 90% of requests for laboratory service with a turnaround time less than 30 days
  • TARGET #5: Less than 5% of unworked requests for laboratory service are over 120 days old
A5: Resource Protection  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Reduce recreational boating accident deaths to fewer than 14 annual fatalities
  • TARGET #2: Wildlife violations detected less than 5% of total resource user contacts
A6: Highway Safety  Details >
  • TARGET #1: 10% reduction from the previous three-year average of deaths as a result of motor vehicle accidents (MVA)
  • TARGET #2: 10% reduction from the previous three-year average of driving under the influence (DUI) fatalities

Performance Detail


A: Result - Department Result

A1: Core Service - Law Enforcement Patrol & Investigations
    
Target #1: 35% of property crimes reported result in the identification of a suspect or offender

Methodology: Source: Alaska UCR Data

Percentage of Property Crimes Investigated and Closed with the Identification of a Suspect or Offender
Year # of Incidents w/Suspect / Offender ID Percent
2016
4,567
1,490
33%
2015
4,213
1,580
38%
2014
3,918
1,446
37%
2013
3,855
1,358
35%
2012
4,201
1,216
29%
2011
4,761
1,247
26%
2010
4,624
1,201
26%
2009
4,765
1,139
24%
2008
4,595
1,108
24%
2007
5,014
1,243
25%
2006
5,043
1,288
26%
2005
5,161
1,488
29%
2004
4,781
1,498
31%

Analysis of results and challenges: This metric provides the Alaska State Troopers the measuring point to evaluate the quality of its initial response to an investigation of property crimes, with the end result an enhanced ability to identify suspects or offenders.

AST reports the number of property crimes within their primary jurisdiction. Property crimes include offenses such as burglary, theft, and criminal mischief. These data include attempted and unfounded burglaries, since they often require the same amount of investigative time to reach an appropriate conclusion. This metric was initially developed in FY2009 and modified in FY2014 to include theft and criminal mischief offenses to better reflect the results of ASTs efforts. The target is based on a review of the data over the last ten years. Calendar year information is reported to allow for greater accuracy in the data collected due to incident closure time frames.


Related links:
   • Alaska UCR Data
   • FBI UCR Data


    
Target #2: 100% homicide solve rate

Methodology: Source: Alaska State Troopers, Alaska Bureau of Investigation (ABI). Data source change in FY2011 to include homicides outside AST jurisdiction where AST assumed investigative responsibility.

Percentage of Homicides Solved by Alaska State Troopers
Fiscal Year Number of Homicides Homicides Solved Percentage Solved
FY 2017
22
20
91%
FY 2016
25
21
84%
FY 2015
28
22
79%
FY 2014
18
16
88%
FY 2013
22
22
100%
FY 2012
14
12
86%
FY 2011
18
17
94%
FY 2010
11
10
91%
FY 2009
10
10
100%
FY 2008
13
11
85%
FY 2007
12
10
83%
FY 2006
8
7
88%

Analysis of results and challenges: Numbers represent homicides in Alaska State Trooper (AST) jurisdiction as well as homicides outside AST jurisdiction where AST has assumed investigative responsibility. Unsolved homicide investigations are on-going and are often closed long after the incident, depending on a wide variety of circumstances.

Related links:
   • Alaska Bureau of Investigation



A2: Core Service - Rural Law Enforcement
    
Target #1: Increase by 5% over the previous year the number of training hours provided to Village Public Safety Officers and other rural law enforcement personnel

Methodology: The measurement was changed in FY 2015 to accurately represent what we can measure and improve upon. The previous measure, while allowing us to capture data, was not a measure that we were able to impact through corrective action. The previous measure relied upon man hours of training however we have no control over how many officers attend sponsored training.

Village Public Safety Officer / Rural Law Enforcement Personnel Training Hours
Fiscal Year LE Personnel Trained Training Hours Provided Target Percent Inc / Dec
FY 2017
53
2,199
10%
-7%
FY 2016
167
2,374
10%
15%
FY 2015
124
1,435
5%
27%
FY 2014
179
1,128
*
*

Analysis of results and challenges: The department is committed to rural law enforcement with statewide leadership in training. Through the efforts of the Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) Program, the department has fostered innovative approaches to training and opportunities for not only VPSOs, but additionally for Village Police Officers, Tribal Police Officers, and other rural Law Enforcement Officers. Due to significant budget cuts, the Department has had to scale back on the number of training hours offered, thus, an overall decrease in the number of training hours will continue to be the trend.

All training is designed to improve the rural law enforcement skills and public safety capabilities of these first responders.


A3: Core Service - Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Programs
    
Target #1: As a result of contact with a victim service program, 80% of participants know more ways to plan for their safety


Percentage of Victim Service Participants Indicating Positive Program Impact
Fiscal Year # of Responses # Affirmative Percent YTD
FY 2017
2,470
2,050
83%
FY 2016
2,510
2,136
85%
FY 2015
2,511
2,159
86%
FY 2014
2,466
2,090
85%
FY 2013
2,729
2,375
87%
FY 2012
3,061
2,813
92%
FY 2011
2,985
2,761
93%
FY 2010
2,655
2,454
92%
FY 2009
1,978
1,833
93%

Analysis of results and challenges: Data for this measure are gathered through confidential surveys completed by program participants when they exit program services. Research has demonstrated that increasing victims' knowledge of safety planning and community resources leads to increased safety and well-being over time. Alaska is participating in a national outcome measures project that uses this measure to monitor reduced violence and increased quality of life for victims over time.

Related links:
   • Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault


    
Target #2: 100% of sex offender registrations are available online

Methodology: This is measured by comparing the total number of known sex offenders in Alaska to the number of offenders whose records require additional research to determine registration duration or other issues.

Percentage of Sex Offender Registrations Available On-line
Fiscal Year Known Sex Offenders Requiring Research Percentage on Website
FY 2017
3,678
+7.76%
14
-22.22%
99.62%
FY 2016
3,413
+3.42%
18
+38.46%
99.44%
FY 2015
3,300
+4.23%
13
-45.83%
99.61%
FY 2014
3,166
+2.49%
24
+50%
99.24%
FY 2013
3,089
+4.32%
16
0%
99.48%
FY 2012
2,961
+3.82%
16
-5.88%
99.50%
FY 2011
2,852
+6.5%
17
-46.88%
99.40%
FY 2010
2,678
+5.85%
32
+433.33%
98.80%
FY 2009
2,530
6
99.76%

Analysis of results and challenges: In nearly every case in which an offender moves into Alaska from another state, additional information must be obtained in order to determine the comparable Alaska statute for registration requirements. Program analysis and development has resulted in the more efficient completion of research required to ensure accurate information on the Sex Offender Registration website, and has reduced the number of offenders' convictions requiring research prior to posting on the website.

The target goal of 100% has not been met, however as policies and procedures are refined, the Sex Offender and Child Kidnapper Registration Office is becoming more proficient at obtaining required documentation and more efficient in completing registration requirement analysis on new registrants.


Related links:
   • Sex Offender Registry homepage



A4: Core Service - Statewide Public Safety Programs
    
Target #1: Reduce unintentional fire fatalities (non-homicide) to less than 13 annual fatalities

Methodology: Source: Division of Fire and Life Safety

A note on methodology: The graph has been simplified with replacing the floating 5-year averages by a fixed target. The target was achieved by averaging the number of unintentional fatalities over a 10-year period, subtracting 5%, and dividing by 10. The target itself is, however, not acceptable--only zero fire fatalities are acceptable.


Number of Fatal Fires with DF&LS Authority vs Number of Fatal Fires with No DF&LS Authority
Year Total Fatalities No F&LS Authority Within F&LS Auth
2016
18
17
1
2015
17
17
0
2014
12
12
0
2013
16
15
1
2012
23
20
3
2011
11
10
1
2010
12
12
0
2009
22
21
1
2008
19
17
2
2007
24
22
2
2006
21
19
2

Analysis of results and challenges: There has been an increase in fire fatalities. Compared to 2015, the number of fire fatalities went from 17 to 18, with one fire fatality under the divisionís statutory authority in 2016. In 2016, 17 fire fatalities occurred in buildings where the division has no statutory authority for plan reviews and fire inspections. There were 15 fire fatalities that occurred in structures. 14 of the 15 fatalities occurred in one or two-family dwellings and one occurred in a multi-residential structure. The division continues to have limited success of reducing unintentional fire fatalities (non-homicide) to less than 13 annual fatalities due to the lack of residential building code and inspection authority, and little direct access to family residences. The division enjoys significant success in all other occupancy types where it is empowered to act.

Smoke alarms failed to work or were not installed in 20% of the residences where fire fatalities occurred. Alcohol or drug-use related fire fatalities increased to 60% in 2016.

Fire and Life Safety data are reported on a calendar year basis. Visit http://dps.alaska.gov/fire/alaskafirestatistics.aspx for annual reports and more information.


Related links:
   • Alaska Fire Statistics


    
Target #2: State and national criminal justice information is released to authorized entities within 10 working days of receipt of the request


Average Number of Days to Disseminate Criminal History Information by Criminal Records and Identification
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2017
19.5
+290%
FY 2016
5
-44.44%
FY 2015
9
-75%
FY 2014
36
+200%
FY 2013
12
+200%
FY 2012
4
+33.33%
FY 2011
3
0%
FY 2010
3
-97.2%
FY 2009
107
+50.7%
FY 2008
71
+115.15%
FY 2007
33

Analysis of results and challenges: Through a significant re-engineering process, an additional fingerprint expert, temporary staffing reallocation, and intense staff effort, the Records and Identification Bureau (Bureau) remarkably improved processing time in FY2010. The Bureau was able to maintain this substantially reduced turnaround time in FY2011 and FY2012, and will continue to assess processes and procedures to further reduce the time it takes to process a background check for employment or licensing purposes. However, in FY2014, significant staffing changes occurred, resulting in a significant increase in the time it took to process fingerprints.

FY2017ís turnaround time was severely impacted by staffing shortages in both the Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) Section and the Records Section. Staffing resources in the Records Section were readjusted in the latter part of FY2017, and a third ABIS Operator (now called Fingerprint Technician II) was hired in the third quarter of FY2017. This uptick in processing time should be an anomaly that will be greatly reduced in FY2018.


Related links:
   • Background Check Requests homepage


    
Target #3: 30% of all buildings scheduled for priority fire and life safety building inspections to be found in compliance at time of inspection

Methodology: Source: Division of Fire and Life Safety

In FY2013, the type of chart used was changed and the total number of inspections completed is provided to show context to the number of buildings in and out of compliance.


Percentage of Buildings in Compliance with Legal Standards According to Inspections
Fiscal Year Total Inspections Buildings in Compliance YTD % in Compliance
FY 2017
1,350
345
25.56
FY 2016
2,236
276
12.34%
FY 2015
1,897
1,030
54.3%
FY 2014
2,086
383
18.4%
FY 2013
3,051
1,175
38.5%
FY 2012
2,665
666
25%
FY 2011
2,529
589
23.3%
FY 2010
2,181
525
24.1%
FY 2009
2,256
855
37.9%
FY 2008
1,543
549
35.6%
FY 2007
659
180
27.3%

Analysis of results and challenges: The number of fire inspections decreased in FY2017. Deputy Fire Marshals (DFMs) conducted 223 of the 1,350 fire inspections. The decrease in number of inspections from FY2016 was due to vacancies in two DFM I positions and a reduction in the travel budget. The lack of recruitment incentives and training benefits, coupled with competing job opportunities, causes difficulties in the retention of fully trained staff and this contributes to the division not being able to meet the target goal of 30%. The TransAlaska Pipeline Fire Safety Specialist conducted 1,127 fire inspections. This position is funded through a Reimbursable Service Agreement (RSA) with the Department of Natural Resources, Joint Pipeline Office.

Prioritization of commercial building inspections continues to be based upon those occupancies that are at greatest risk of fire-related injuries, fatalities, property loss, and community impact. The division is striving to increase owner/occupant hazard awareness so a greater number of buildings will be found in compliance with legal standards at the time of inspection.

When an inspection generates an Order to Correct Deficiencies, each deficiency must be rectified as mandated by the Alaska Supreme Court in Adams vs. the State of Alaska.

There were 1,017 follow up communication actions in support of the 1,005 fire inspections that were not in compliance in FY2017. This is the fifth year that the division completed fire inspections in all oil and gas processing facilities for regulated and unregulated pipelines throughout the state. Again this year, we had one unintended fire fatality in a facility in which we had previously conducted a fire inspection.


Related links:
   • Division of Fire and Life Safety


    
Target #4: 90% of requests for laboratory service with a turnaround time less than 30 days

Methodology: A Legislative Audit conducted in FY2017 found that the records for Laboratory Services were not accurately kept. The data from FY2010-FY2016 reflected in this graph has been updated to reflect accurate records

Percentage of State Crime Laboratory Service Requests Accomplished in Less than 30 Days
Fiscal Year Requests < 30 days Total # Requested
FY 2017
59%
3,133
FY 2016
61%
3,253
FY 2015
58%
3,713
FY 2014
63%
3,835
FY 2013
47%
3,573
FY 2012
64%
3,408
FY 2011
58%
3,457
FY 2010
58%
3,309

Analysis of results and challenges: Total requests do not include toxicology (outsourced), DNA database samples (reported under its own metric), or proficiency/training requests (internal requests necessary for the operation of the laboratory). Turnaround time is calculated as the time when a request for service is created until a scientific examination report is issued.

98% of Controlled Substance and Blood Alcohol Requests (46% of all requests for service) were completed in under 30 days, with an average turnaround time of 10 days, and as such, exceed the performance metric.

Firearms, Latent Prints, and Forensic Biology have all experienced staffing shortages with long unsuccessful recruitments for experienced analysts. Vacancies were eventually filled with entry level analysts, but these disciplines have long training programs (exceeding one year) and there is a net loss of productivity as experienced analysts divide their time between training new analysts and analysis of evidence.


Related links:
   • Alaska State Crime Laboratory


    
Target #5: Less than 5% of unworked requests for laboratory service are over 120 days old

Methodology: A Legislative Audit conducted in FY2017 found that the records for Laboratory Services were not accurately kept. The data from FY2010-FY2016 reflected in this graph has been updated to reflect accurate records.

Percentage of State Crime Laboratory Service Requests Over 120 Days Old
Fiscal Year Percentage over 120 days Total # Requested
FY 2017
8%
3,133
FY 2016
10%
3,253
FY 2015
13%
3,713
FY 2014
8%
3,835
FY 2013
13%
3,573
FY 2012
13%
3,408
FY 2011
9%
3,457
FY 2010
9%
3,309

Analysis of results and challenges: The target goal of less than 5% of unworked requests for laboratory service over 120 days old was not met. The reduction/elimination of backlogged requests for service continue to be a high priority. Of the requests received, 25% of Latent Print requests (166 of 672) had a turnaround time greater than 120 days. The Latent Print discipline has experienced vacancies. The vacancies have recently been filled with entry level analysts, and once their training is completed, turnaround time should improve.

8% of Forensic Biology requests (biological screening, DNA) exceeded 120 days. The Forensic Biology discipline is looking to implement new analytical work flows (anticipated implementation January 2018) as part of their continuing efforts to streamline analysis.

.

Related links:
   • Alaska State Crime Laboratory



A5: Core Service - Resource Protection
    
Target #1: Reduce recreational boating accident deaths to fewer than 14 annual fatalities

Methodology: Source: U.S. Coast Guard

The target is a 10-year average of recreational boating deaths from 2002-2011.


Analysis of results and challenges: Fatalities from recreational boating accidents nearly doubled in calendar year 2016. The target of less than 14 recreational boating deaths was exceeded. The number of deaths is similar to that experience between 2007 through 2013.

Alaska Wildlife Troopers (AWT) are working to increase boating safety education and checking for compliance with law and regulation, including personal flotation device possession and use -- especially education among adults, as adult deaths continue to make up the majority of fatalities. AWT conducted several targeted boating safety patrols during the past year in conjunction with advertised national campaigns and on historically busy weekends. Troopers investigate recreational boating accidents, injuries, and fatalities in state waters.


Related links:
   • Alaska DNR Office of Boating Safety
   • U.S. Coast Guard statistics
   • Alaska Wildlife Troopers


    
Target #2: Wildlife violations detected less than 5% of total resource user contacts


Percentage of Wildlife Violations Detected per User Contacts by Alaska Wildlife Troopers
Fiscal Year # of Contacts # of Violations Detected % Violations/Contacts
FY 2017
61,719
3,031
4.91%
FY 2016
81,109
3,713
4.57%
FY 2015
75,016
4,053
5.40%
FY 2014
75,732
3,873
5.11%
FY 2013
69,749
4,086
5.86%
FY 2012
75,624
4,076
5.39%
FY 2011
85,867
4,176
4.86%
FY 2010
82,336
4,015
4.88%
FY 2009
63,068
4,742
7.52%
FY 2008
58,584
4,995
8.53%
FY 2007
54,912
6,083
11.08%

Analysis of results and challenges: The number of resource users contacted by Alaska Wildlife Troopers (AWT) decreased significantly during the past year. Wildlife violations detected increased slightly as a percentage of total contacts over the previous year; however the amount was less than one percent. The decrease in resource user contacts is a result of restricted operations of AWT personnel, as well as a shift in operations to times and areas where risk to natural resources perceived to be the greatest.

These numbers do not include citations written by wildlife troopers for non-natural resource law violations, such as those generated for traffic enforcement or other general law enforcement duties. The wildlife troopers averaged seven vacancies throughout the year. In addition to the vacancies, budget reductions forced AWT positions to be eliminated. In the last three years, AWT has eliminated eight Trooper positions, and seven non-commissioned positions which support operations, resulting in less coverage statewide. AWT is attempting to focus efforts where concerns for populations of wild stocks of fish and game are high, but the opportunity to contact the general public engaged in hunting and fishing activity are often reduced.

Targeting 95% compliance is a reasonable goal. Less than 95% compliance indicates a need to reevaluate enforcement presence and education efforts. A loss of commissioned personnel meant fewer hours were available to spend on education.

AWT prefers to change this performance goal as it does not accurately reflect AWT performance or the number of violations discovered by AWT. In addition, there are a number of inconsistencies in reporting for this target which fail to truly reflect resource user contacts and violations discovered. As an example, the column indicating the number of violations detected has historically been reported solely for citations issued. It does not account for violations for which the person was warned which frequently occurs when a Trooper contacts a person and discovers multiple violations. A more accurate measure of the percentage of violations per contact would be to report the total of citations and warnings per contact. A review of historical data reflects a consistent violation rate of between 10 to 13 percent.

AWT would welcome a discussion on a more appropriate measure of effectiveness.


Related links:
   • Alaska Wildlife Troopers



A6: Core Service - Highway Safety
    
Target #1: 10% reduction from the previous three-year average of deaths as a result of motor vehicle accidents (MVA)

Methodology: Note: Data source changed in CY2007; data now reported for area of AST jurisdiction only. Source: Alaska State Troopers

Number of Fatalities from Motor Vehicle Accidents
Year MVA Yearly Fatalities
2016
57
2015
38
2014
43
2013
30
2012
39
2011
45
2010
42
2009
34
2008
46
2007
46

Analysis of results and challenges: This target reflects one measure of the overall safety of vehicular traffic. In addition to enforcement of traffic regulations and laws, the department is actively involved in media campaigns to raise public awareness of highway safety issues. The Alaska Bureau of Highway Patrol (ABHP) was reduced to three Troopers during 2015 and they are primarily working on the Seward Highway. Calendar year 2016 saw a high number of fatal crashes in low traffic areas of the state that are not connected to the state road system. Many of the other variables affecting the motor vehicle crash rate, such as road design, weather conditions, vehicle age and mechanical condition, etc., are not within the department's control.


Beginning in 2007, this table shows motor vehicle crashes within the Alaska State Troopers' patrol area. Statewide data from the Alaska Highway Safety Office were reported in prior years. These data are reported on a calendar-year basis. Calendar year information is reported to allow for greater accuracy in the data collected due to incident closure time frames.


Related links:
   • Alaska State Troopers


    
Target #2: 10% reduction from the previous three-year average of driving under the influence (DUI) fatalities

Methodology: * Data source changed in CY2007; data now reported for area of AST jurisdiction only. Source: Alaska State Troopers


Motor Vehicle Crashes with Fatalities involving Impaired Drivers
Year MVA Yearly Fatalities
2016
21
2015
10
2014
15
2013
5
2012
11
2011
8
2010
12
2009
21
2008
16
2007
6

Analysis of results and challenges: The department receives Alaska Highway Safety Office funding to support some specialized High Visibility DUI enforcement through the Alaska Bureau of Highway Patrol. Targeted enforcement at special events like the Palmer State Fair and other events have been highly effective at removing impaired drivers from the road. However, the number and severity of accidents involve many other factors which are often outside the control or influence of police agencies. Some of the accidents in 2016 were on low traffic areas that are not connected to the state road system.

Beginning in CY2007, this table shows motor vehicle crashes within the Alaska State Troopers' patrol area. Statewide data from the Alaska Highway Safety Office (DOT/PF) were reported in prior years. These data are reported on a calendar-year basis. Calendar year information is reported to allow for greater accuracy in the data collected due to incident closure time frames.

In 2017 it was discovered that the grid used in previous budget submissions contained only the number for crashes that included an impaired driver when that person was charged with DUI. This year the grid was updated to include where drivers were impaired but not charged. An example would be where a single vehicle crash occurred and the driver was found to be impaired. We believe that the grid above more accurately shows the connection between impairment and fatal crashes.


Related links:
   • Alaska State Troopers


 

Current as of December 1, 2017